Labor and the Humanities: Prospects and Possibilities

The Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities will be holding a forum, “Labor and the Humanities: Prospects and Possibilities”, on Tuesday, February 7 at 3:30pm in the Humanities Lecture Hall, IPRH at 805 West Pennsylvania Ave, Urbana. Please join us in discussing the following questions:
– What does the labor force in the humanities look like today?
– What are the pressing problems in the humanities market?
– Can unionization redress the inequities plaguing the humanities today?
– What can we learn from current labor struggles, most notably the recent NYU strike?
Panelists include: DAVE MORRIS (English, GEO Co-President), ANTOINETTE BURTON (History), PEDRO CABAN (Inst. of Communications Research & African American Studies), CARY NELSON (English), and JOHN MARSH (IPRH & English)
(click on the title for more information about the panelists)


Panelists
ANTOINETTE BURTON is chair of the History Department at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Her work has focused on women, gender and empire in the context of modern Britain and colonial India. She is the author of Burdens of History: British Feminists, Indian Women, and Imperial Culture, 1865-1915 (1994), At the Heart of the Empire: Indians and the Colonial Encounter in Late-Victorian Britain (1998), and Dwelling in the Archive: Women Writing House, Home and History in Late Colonial India (2003).
PEDRO CABAN is Professor of Communications Research and African American Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign. His research focuses on the political economy of Puerto Rico, US – Puerto Rico relations, and Latinos in the United States. In addition to numerous articles, edited books, and editorships, he is the author of Constructing a Colonial People: Puerto Rico and the United States, 1898 – 1932 (1999).
JOHN MARSH is Assistant Director of the Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities and a Lecturer in the English Department at the University of Illinois. His research focuses on how work, workers, and working-class political movements influenced and created a diverse set of modern American poets. He is also director of the Champaign Odyssey Project, a free, college-level course in the humanities offered to people living below or slightly above the federal poverty level.
DAVID MORRIS is a third year graduate student in the English Department at the University of Illinois and co-president of the Graduate Employee Organization, which represents teaching assistants and graduate assistants at the University of Illinois. His research interests include new media, communication technology, and US popular culture after WWII.
CARY NELSON is Jubilee Professor of Liberal Arts and Sciences at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign. His research focuses on the culture of the American Left, and among many other publications, he is the author, most recently, of Academic Keywords: A Devil’s Dictionary for Higher Education (1999), Revolutionary Memory: Recovering the Poetry of the American Left (2001), and Office Hours: Activism and Change in the Academy (2004).
For more information, please contact the IPRH at 244-3344
or go online at http://www.iprh.uiuc.edu